Dry fire practice

Dry fire practice

This is a discussion on Dry fire practice within the Ruger MK III forums, part of the Ruger Standard & MK Pistols category; I need to dry fire practice for the competition that I want to get back in. I need to shoot at five targets in a ...

Like Tree7Likes

Thread: Dry fire practice

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1 Dry fire practice 
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    8
    I need to dry fire practice for the competition that I want to get back in. I need to shoot at five targets in a short period. But a 22/45 can only fire in single action (besides, you don't really want to dry fire a rim fire). Can anyone suggest a gun (any type of action) that would allow me to practice?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2 Re: Dry fire practice 
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    The South will Rise
    Posts
    2,763
    I train frequently with a air pistol. It is a enormously beneficial way to train. When the ammo shortage was going on, I trained almost daily with a air pistol, and when I returned to the powder burner range, is was obvious that the training paid off. I also tain with 22.cal. For fast quick shooting with a small pistol, I use a Phoenix HPA. (actually I own two of these). I own quite a few air pistols, and one in particular is a replica 1911 with blowback (recoil). He has about a 3oz trigger. A tin of 500 pellets is one cheap way to have fun shooting and training at the same time. I also have a Makarov BB gun that is about the same size as my LC9S. Get to the point where you can hit tin cans thrown in the air, and you will see your point and shoot skills really developing. I have some magnum spring loaded Pellet guns that do have a lot of recoil. Shooting long range with these is also a fun way to develop trigger and breathing control. The Bersa 22.cal and the Ruger SR22 are ideal for powder burner training.
    GunnyBlue and louchia like this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3 Re: Dry fire practice 
    Super Moderator toytraindoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Celebration, FL
    Posts
    4,563
    When I practice, I just dry fire my Elsie and my Mod2 .45 and I do all my drills throughout my house. That's what I do and I hope this info helps.
    toytraindoc

    NRA Life Memeber
    Why come to me for answers? What have I done to deserve such generosity.
    In GOD We Trust
    Question Everything
    Logic will get you from A to B, Imagination will take you everywhere.
    μολὼν λαβέ
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. Remove Advertisements
    RugerPistolForums.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4 Re: Dry fire practice 
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    8
    I did some research on the Makarov and found Pyramyd Air. They have a huge selection of BB and Airsoft guns. These include copies of almost everything from Crossman to match grade airguns. They have several versions of the 1911 that look interesting.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5 Re: Dry fire practice 
    Hero Member GunnyBlue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    590
    "The RUGER SR22 pistols can be dry-fired without damage to the firing pin or other components as long as the magazine is inserted." - Excerpt from the SR22 Manual
    http://ruger-docs.s3.amazonaws.com/_...sr22Pistol.pdf

    For best accuracy, I would suggest the 4.50" model over the 3.50" model.
    Ruger® SR22® * Rimfire Pistol Model 3620

    I agree with davevabch that training with air pistols is a great, inexpensive way to train, particularly for .22 cal.
    I also own a number of pellet and BB pistols, revolvers and rifles. Pyramid is a good source. I've bought several from them.
    louchia likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6 Re: Dry fire practice 
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    8
    That makes the SR so unusual in the Rimfire category. I have had my SR for a while and can now use it safely use it for practice as well. Looking at the videos, the Winchester 11 looks good even though the sights are fixed and not target style.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7 Re: Dry fire practice 
    Super Moderator SkipD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    S.E. Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,812
    Quote Originally Posted by scottselby View Post
    That makes the SR so unusual in the Rimfire category. I have had my SR for a while and can now use it safely use it for practice as well. Looking at the videos, the Winchester 11 looks good even though the sights are fixed and not target style.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    My suggestion is to very carefully inspect the area of the barrel right around the chamber after rapping off a few dry fire "shots". Look for any signs of impact by the firing pin. If you see no signs of impact or only light peening of the flat surface that the bolt contacts, you're OK. However, if there's any peening over of the edge of the chamber, you should not proceed with dry firing. I have a tool (available through Brownells) that can remove the peened-over edge of the chamber by pushing it back where it belongs instead of cutting it off. If you need the tool, let me know and I'll look it up and give you a link.
    Skip Douglas
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8 Re: Dry fire practice 
    Super Member Denny4kids's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Treasure Valley
    Posts
    2,413
    Quote Originally Posted by scottselby View Post
    I need to dry fire practice for the competition that I want to get back in. I need to shoot at five targets in a short period. But a 22/45 can only fire in single action (besides, you don't really want to dry fire a rim fire). Can anyone suggest a gun (any type of action) that would allow me to practice?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Welcome to the forum scottselby! I think it is great you want to get back into competition! Your 22/45 is very popular here shooting steel challenge.
    For me dry firing for competition with anything other than my competition weapon would be a waist of time. Practice is always great but for competition practice I will always use my game gun. You should not dry fire your 22/45. Your manual makes no mention of dry firing. You might want to ask Ruger about it. Good luck with getting back into it! Please let us know how you are doing. Denny
    GunnyBlue likes this.
    "We do not rise to our expectations, we fall to the level of our training" Archilocus, Greek Soldier, Poet, 650 B.C.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9 Re: Dry fire practice 
    Hero Member GunnyBlue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    590
    +1 Denny

    The issue with using a handgun other than your .22 cal competition gun (.22 cal, centerfire, or Air Pistol), for dry-fire training is that the substitute gun will not be exactly the same - trigger pull, sight radius, grip, etc.

    A good alternative might be to use your 22/45 for dry-fire practice, BUT use snap caps or drywall anchors #4-6 x 7/8" (Yellow) to prevent damage to your 22/45's firing pin.

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Crown-Bol...4772/100338197 $3.92/100

    louchia likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10 Re: Dry fire practice 
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    The South will Rise
    Posts
    2,763
    Practicing dry fire with all kinds of weapons, (air guns, your finger. lasers or whatever, does more than help you get the feel of a particular weapon. It develops eye, mind and reflex coordination. It should be the "FOUNDATION" and base for all shooting. Using your own weapon for competition shooting is "exercise specific" up on the training level. Think of this training as a triangle or "Pyramid" training. The base portion of the Pyramid should be the largest portion of rising to the top of the Pyramid through a series of levels. Take a target on a next level and place 5 targets on one target and spend hours quickly moving from target to target using a bb gun. You are developing your eyes and brain to focus and become natural. a natural laser. Later move up the pyramid and use your own specific gun and then finally live fire practice with a specific weapon which is the top of the pyramid.Rise to the top of the Pyramid and then repeat all levels. This holds true with any sport. Hone your NATURAL skills. "THE GREATER THE BASE, THE GREATER THE RESULTS. Remember you can dry fire every single day. Turn your hand, your mind, your eyes into a laser.
    This guy below, while not dry firing, is just shooting a Pellet gun. I would say his eye/and natural muscle movements are pretty good. You could do this in your own back yard.

    Reply With Quote  
     

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New
Ads
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Dry fire the LCP?
    By libertytree in forum General LCP Discussion
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 01-19-2015, 09:24 AM
  2. Dry Fire
    By icerigger2 in forum Gunsmithing
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 05-01-2014, 02:56 AM
  3. Lc9 dry fire model
    By twofingerson in forum LC9 Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-01-2012, 04:06 PM
  4. Dry fire problems?
    By Iacountryboy in forum General LCP Discussion
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 01-10-2012, 01:24 PM
  5. Can you dry fire the LC9 to much???
    By BBGUNN in forum LC9 Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-12-2011, 08:00 PM