Disconnector Details

Disconnector Details

This is a discussion on Disconnector Details within the Ruger MK II forums, part of the Ruger Standard & MK Pistols category; The factory disconnector, which some call the "trigger bar", is one of those restricted parts that Ruger will not sell to anyone, as a separate ...

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Thread: Disconnector Details

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  1. #1 Disconnector Details 
    Full Member SGW Gunsmith's Avatar
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    The factory disconnector, which some call the "trigger bar", is one of those restricted parts that Ruger will not sell to anyone, as a separate item. The claim is, the disconnector ( hereafter noted as "disco" ) needs to be fitted to the individual 'fire control system' at the factory.

    I've been working with the Ruger Mark pistols for half a century, beginning this year, and I've replaced factory disco's with every aftermarket brand and type that have ever been produced, with satisfactory results. And, nobody came along and took my birthday away:



    I've weighed every aftermarket disco that I could legally purchase, and so far, no black helicopters have landed on our empire filled full of ninja dudes with handcuffs. All have worked fairly well to do what they are supposed to do, with a few brands needing some assistance to work, what I feel. is done in the proper manner. When you actually see how the disco works to activate the sear so that the hammer can go forward and smack into the rear end of the firing pin, there is a few things to contemplate. The main concern, at least for me, is how the full length of that disco is being lifted, and how the lifting is actually done:



    Imagine trying to lift a 2 x 4 from one end, by yourself. Depending on your strength and how long that board is, it can be a struggle to get the far end of the 2 x 4 up. Right, it's just an analogy, but hopefully, it provides some idea as to what is expected of the trigger plunger spring.
    The action involved with the factory trigger plunger spring and how it reacts with the factory disco's weight works fairly well to get the job done. So, why then, are there so many aftermarket discos out there? A couple of reasons; Ruger will not sell those, so, aftermarket discos are now available. Another reason is that some Ruger Mark pistol owners have complained that *THEY* can feel a certain amount of flexing involved with the factory disco as the trigger is pulled backward. Really?
    Let's examine that complaint, and take another look at the factory disco above. Can you imagine the excessive pull weight involved that would have the disco flex sideways before it comes off the sear and allows the hammer to go forward?
    Volquartsen has now offered a "steel" disco, to eliminate any flexing accusations, and that is now the heaviest disco available, and it's provided with a lighter weight spring than the factory spring to help with lowering trigger pull weight. But, how well does the lighter spring lift the full length of the disco? To be safe, I recommend that the factory trigger plunger spring be used with the heavier disco, if that one is your choice, and I've even tested a slightly stronger trigger plunger spring that lifts the VC disco a bit more smartly, so it trips the sear, without adding to the trigger pull weight as measured.
    Volquartsen used to offer a titanium disconnector which was the lightest of them all, and I still have a couple of those squirreled away that I use when testing even lighter trigger plunger springs. Why do I do this stuff? Only 'cuz I gots to know.
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  2. #2 Re: Disconnector Details 
    Full Member SGW Gunsmith's Avatar
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    Not many Ruger Mark pistol owners are aware of it, but Volquartsen, for what only seemed like a moment in time, made their first version of the "steel" disconnector out of aluminum. The survival rate for those discos was very brutal when encountering the hardened steel bolt as it travels backward and then forward again. This is a pretty rare sighting of one of those parts:

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