115 vs. 124 vs. 147 gr 9mm

This is a discussion on 115 vs. 124 vs. 147 gr 9mm within the Semi Autos forums, part of the Other Firearms category; So I have 115, 124 and 147 gr. 9mm Hydrashocks in my basement. Thus far I have been using 124 gr as defensive ammo. I ...

Thread: 115 vs. 124 vs. 147 gr 9mm

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  1. #1 115 vs. 124 vs. 147 gr 9mm 
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    So I have 115, 124 and 147 gr. 9mm Hydrashocks in my basement. Thus far I have been using 124 gr as defensive ammo. I picked this simply because I know the NYPD uses 124 gr, although it is gold dot instead of hydrashock. It was sort of a gut feeling for my choice. Does anybody have any reason why I should pick one over another? Oh, by the way the gun is my Hi-Point C9. Thanks.
    "We learn by doing if we reflect on what we have done" John Dewey
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  2. #2 Re: 115 vs. 124 vs. 147 gr 9mm 
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    I think generally the heavier the bullet, the deeper the penetration. But you get lower velocity in the bargain, not sure if that by itself affects expansion in hollow points. Personally, I feel comfortable with almost any round used by LE, or one which has tested well. As long as they are reliable in your gun, the well known brands should be fine, when put on target. Got to pick your poison, as they say...

    I have in 9mm
    hornady CD FTX in 115 gr
    speer 124 gr gold dots +p I think
    corbon/glaser pow'rball 100 gr +p

    Never shot nothing but paper, so don't really know but that any of these should be reasonably OK. Your hydra shoks are a proven round, if by some standards a little older design.

    unclenunzie, who seems to collect SD ammo
    unclenunzie

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  3. #3 Re: 115 vs. 124 vs. 147 gr 9mm 
    Markis82
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    Also, the heavier the bullet the more recoil. Simple physics. For every action there is a reaction. So, the more weight that is pushed forward the more energy that is pushed backward. You need to test them all and see which is most accurate for you.
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  4. #4 Re: 115 vs. 124 vs. 147 gr 9mm 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Techie13804
    So I have 115, 124 and 147 gr. 9mm Hydrashocks in my basement. Thus far I have been using 124 gr as defensive ammo. I picked this simply because I know the NYPD uses 124 gr, although it is gold dot instead of hydrashock. It was sort of a gut feeling for my choice. Does anybody have any reason why I should pick one over another? Oh, by the way the gun is my Hi-Point C9. Thanks.
    All three are good and when Massad speaks, I listen. It's a few years old, but here's something to read about it:

    "Most of the following opinions are based upon the work of Massad Ayoob, Evan Marshall and Ed Sanow, police officers who have extensively studied the issue of firearms, ammunition and stopping power. I refer all interested parties to the excellent series by Ayoob ('In the Gravest Extreme,''Stressfire,' 'The Semi-Automatic Pistol in Police Service and Self-Defense', 'Stressfire II: Advanced Combat Shotgun') and the comprehensive book 'Stopping Power' by Marshall and Sanow.


    I cannot stress too heavily that the primary determinant of stopping power is BULLET PLACEMENT. A cool, deliberate marksman with a little .32 Walther PPK will beat a panicky, inaccurate man with a .357 Magnum or $1200 customized .45 auto every time. Whatever firearm and caliber you select, you must practice firing hundreds - thousands - of rounds in realistic defensive scenarios until you can confidently make disabling hits on your target. Tactics and marksmanship win gunfights - not having the latest 'wonder bullet' in your gun.

    9mm Parabellum (9mm Luger,9x19mm, 9mm NATO, or simply "9mm")

    This is unquestionably the world's most popular pistol round. For this reason it has been the subject of a lot of experimentation, because 9mm ball - used by every army in the Western world - is a mediocre manstopper. Jacketed hollowpoints are a must if one wishes to rely on the 9mm as a defense round. Use ball ammo for practice only.

    9mm ammunition is available to the public in two pressure levels: standard and "+P." The latter should only be used in newer guns (made since 1985 or so), and is best used sparingly. I will deal here with only commercially available ammunition: there are specialized loads available only to law enforcement personnel. Civilians should not worry, as there are commercial loads as good or better than anything restricted to law enforcement usage.

    I will now tell you the best 9mm Luger load for self-defense: it is the Cor-Bon 9mm 115 grain +P Jacketed Hollowpoint. This is the most powerful and street-proven manstopper available in this caliber. It is a high velocity (1340 fps) and high pressure round, and more effective than any load restricted to law enforcement use (such as the Federal 9BPLE).

    Unfortunately, it is also likely to jam many older guns. For this reason I add a table at the end of the 9mm section discussing round suitability for different guns. Modern hollowpoints may either (a) jam, or (b) be too powerful for some older guns. This load is suitable only for First Class pistols (see table).

    The best standard pressure 9mm load is the Federal 115 grain JHP (9BP). Its effectiveness and accuracy make it the world standard. Buy several boxes. Other excellent standard pressure 9mm loads are the Winchester Silvertip 115 grain (X9MMSHP), and Federal 124 grain Hydra-shok (P9HS1).

    For guns that may jam with the Cor-Bon or Federal 115 grain hollow-points, the Remington 115 grain +P JHP is a good choice (R9MM6). For older guns I would use the Remington standard pressure 115 gr. JHP (R9MM1).

    Now it is time to impart some crucial information: NEVER use 147 grain ammo in a 9mm pistol! There was a stupid fad for 147 grain hollowpoints a few years ago, and many were suckered into buying these weak, worthless and malfunction-prone rounds. I don't care what you've heard: never use any 9mm hollowpoint heavier than 125 grains. 147 grain hollowpoints often jam in many popular 9mm guns like the Browning Hi-Power, SIG, Beretta 92, S&W and Glock. Ignore the gun magazine hype and stick to what works. If you want to gamble, go to Reno. Don't gamble with your life. 147 grain ammo sucks.

    Bad 9mm Loads to avoid (and certainly NEVER carry). Numbers given:

    Federal Gold Medal 9mm 147 grain JHP (9MS)
    Federal Hydra-Shok 9mm 147 grain JHP (P9HS2)
    Winchester 147 grain 9mm Silvertip Subsonic JHP (X9MMST147)
    Winchester 147 grain 9mm Super-X Subsonic (XSUB9MM)
    Remington 147 grain 9mm JHP (R9MM
    Remington 147 grain 9mm Golden Saber JHP (GS9MMC)
    Remington 140 grain 9mm JHP (R9MM7)
    Remington 88 grain 9mm JHP (R9MM5) This bullet is far too light.
    CCI Lawman 147 grain 9mm PHP "Plated Hollow Point" (3619)

    Table Of 9mm Pistols.

    (Note: just because your pistol appears in Class 3, say, doesn't mean it is unreliable: it may indeed feed hollowpoints. But you must fire at least 200 rounds of your chosen JHP carry load to determine if your pistol will feed them properly. I have placed pistols in each category according to reputation and experience. These are only meant as guidelines - your pistol may feed JHP rounds better - or worse - than this table indicates)

    First Class pistols are ultra-reliable and high-quality new guns than can feed any hollowpoint and tolerate +P loads with no problems: SIG/Sauer P220 series. Czech CZ75 and CZ85. Walther P5, P5C, and P88. Heckler and Koch USP and P7 series. All Glocks. All Ruger 9mm pistols. Taurus PT-99, PT-92 and PT-92C. Steyr GB. Beretta 92 series. Browning BDM and Hi-Power (if it says "Portugal" on the slide). All Smith & Wessons with a four-digit model number (e.g. 5906, 3913, 6904, 5903) and the Smith & Wesson 900 series. Star M28, M30, M31, and all Firestars, Megastars, and Ultrastars.

    Second Class pistols are high quality guns that may not feed all hollowpoints reliably. Remington 115 gr. hollowpoints are recommended for these guns: Smith & Wessons with two or three digit model numbers (e.g. 659, 39-2, 469, 59, 39). Heckler and Koch VP70 and P9S. Beretta "Brigadier" M1951 and the Egyptian copy, the Interarms "Helwan." Colt M2000 "All-American" (now discontinued, for good reason), Colt Series 70 Government Model, Series 70 Commander. Astra A-70, A-75 and A-100. AMT "On Duty." Daewoo. Bersa 'Thunder 9'. EAA Witness, and all other CZ-75 copies (e.g. Tanfoglio, Tanarmi, Springfield Armory P9). Taurus PT-908. Walther P4. Star BK, BKM, Model B and 'Super.' Browning Hi-Powers without the word "Portugal" on the slide. Llama Model 82. IMI "Jericho" and "Kareen."

    Third Class pistols should generally be loaded with ball for best reliability - experiment with your gun extensively before carrying JHP: Walther P38, P4 or P1. Luger. Llama. Maverick. MKS Model JS. Intratec CAT-9, DC-9, KG-9, etc. SWD Cobray Model 11/9 and similar models. Scarab Scorpion. Kimel AP-9. Bryco Jennings Model 59. All KBI Hungarian pistols (e.g. GKK, PJ9C, P9HK and other "FEG" products). "Norinco" or "Sportarms" Chinese Tokarev pistols. Lahti. Radom. MAB P15 and Model 1950."
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  5. #5 Re: 115 vs. 124 vs. 147 gr 9mm 
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    My Sig 225, 226 and 229's have no problem with 147gr. And there shouldn't be any problem's with jamming when compared with 125gr. Both usually have the same COL. The 147gr just take up more powder space (at least with my reloads and with my Win Ranger SXT's).

    I personally carry win ranger +p 124 gr JHP or Federal JHP 9PBLE (my #1 in my sig P6 due to older feed ramp).

    Honestly, shot placement and reliability are the most important. I'd rather carry 115gr FMJ over the hottest SD round if it didn't jam.
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  6. #6 Re: 115 vs. 124 vs. 147 gr 9mm 
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    I read Ayoobs "In the Gravestest Extreme" many moons ago. I still have a copy in the library. I just added The Gun Digest Book of Combat Handgunnery, 6th Edition. I've been carrying a Speer Gold Dot 147 grain SD round in my Sig P-239 for years, with no jams or other problems. Of course I haven't had to "use" it lately. I do believe I'll try the 124 grain and see if it makes any difference in accuracy, when I change out my SD Ammunition in June.

    I don't carry a weapon and look for trouble, I carry one just in case trouble finds me.
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  7. #7 Re: 115 vs. 124 vs. 147 gr 9mm 
    Hero Member deadhead1971's Avatar
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    Also, the heavier the bullet the more recoil. Simple physics.
    Yep. I shot several boxes of 115--no problem--feels great. Shot 1 box of 147, and it was a little more uncomfortable. This was with a Kahr PM9 which is a small subcompact.

    The loaded magazine has Speer 124s Gold Dots and the backup magazine has Federal 124 hydra shok. The Gold Dots are said to be able to go through windshields better in tests. That's why I carry them.

    These look to be the nastiest rounds out there based on what I have read-- http://www.extremeshockusa.com/cgist...=1&cart_id=134
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  8. #8 Re: 115 vs. 124 vs. 147 gr 9mm 
    Super Member Tarheel's Avatar
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    ...dh, I was thinking of ExtremeShock a few months ago when I purchased my SR9. However, after reading this article I decided to stick with my Gold Dots and Hydra-shok's...both have served me well and I know what to expect from both.

    http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/bot23.htm

    Tarheel
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  9. #9 Re: 115 vs. 124 vs. 147 gr 9mm 
    Hero Member BEARDOG's Avatar
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    Here is a comparison tool from Winchester for their Ranger ammo. I know you said you use Hydro-shoks, but this is a great way to look at different weights and calibers to see how they perform in lots of different barriers. I have 9mm Ranger T's in 147gr and 127gr +p+ and feel good about using either one.
    Check it out,
    http://www.winchester.com/SiteCollec...law_bullit.swf
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  10. #10 Re: 115 vs. 124 vs. 147 gr 9mm 
    Super Member Tarheel's Avatar
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    ...good read, Beardog...thx for the link.

    Tarheel
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